Free CCNA | The Life of a Packet | Day 12 | CCNA 200-301 Complete Course



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In this video we will review the processes involved in sending an IP packet to remote networks, including ARP, encapsulation, de-encapsulation, MAC addresses, etc.

In this FREE and COMPLETE CCNA 200-301 course you will find lecture videos covering all topics in Cisco official exam topics list, end-of-video quizzes to test your knowledge, flashcards to review, and practice labs to get hands-on experience. At the end there will also be multiple complete practice exams, to make sure you’re ready for the real thing. Subscribe to follow along.

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Léa LOPEZ

Léa LOPEZ

Léa LOPEZ, Telecom System Administrator, Ambala College of Engineering and Applied Research, Ambala (INDIA)

37 thoughts on “Free CCNA | The Life of a Packet | Day 12 | CCNA 200-301 Complete Course

  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    thank you jeremy man. Im using these videos exclusively to study along with the flash cards and labs. I just found out a few days ago that your course isnt finished 🙁 im really hoping to have my CCNA by early next year but I saw you said in another comment that you hope to be finished next year. Is there anything else youd recommend if youre not finished? Maybe CBT Nuggets or Boson for the practice tests?

    thank you again so much. These videos are helping me IMMENSELY. you are an amazing instructor. More thorough than anyone ive watched. And the easiest to listen to!

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Those quiz questions really helps. Trust me those really helps and corrects us if we understood wrong or had some confusions

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    I was never interested in completing my CCNA, but now I am binge watching your videos and labs. Thank you for this amazing course.

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Totally separate question:

    This video followed static routing in your series.
    But the topology of the "Configuring Static Routes" video was a linear format
    with no redundant links or alternate possible paths between networks.
    So in the diagram shown in "The life of a packet" video:
    When R1 wants to (after a static route(s) is/are configured)
    send a packet to 192.168.4.1/24…is it possible to configure a static route to that network on both
    Gi0/0 And Gi0/1 for R1? Would that create an error? Would it be able to
    load-balance between the two routes? Will it only pick one route everytime?
    If it is possible to create both static routes, how does the router know where to send it: g0/0 or g0/1?

    For example if on router1 we set up:
    ip route 192.168.4.0 255.255.255.0 gi0/0
    ip route 192.168.4.0 255.255.255.0 gi0/1

    How would the router act in that case?
    if all cables/interfaces had the same reliability and speed and
    it's obviously the same hop count.. how would two conflicting
    static routes of the exact same network (192.168.4.0/24) respond?

    Another question:
    You mentioned that if a router doesn't have a route to an IP address then
    it will simply drop the packet. But then what's the point of setting the
    gateway of last resort? Wouldn't any IP address fall under the
    0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 network? So why would the router drop the packet?
    Wouldn't it send it the default gateway (or gateway of last resort)?
    And assuming it would send a random packet to the gateway of last resort:
    I'm looking at this closed WAN of 4 routers…would it be a bad idea to set
    all 4 routers to have a gateway of last resort? Because it seems no matter
    what combination of ports you set it up on it, it would cause some kind
    of broadcast storm and the packet would bog down the network
    until its time to live (TTL) reaches 0. So if either PC
    tried to ping a bad IP like 192.168.42.42, what would the life of the ICMP based packet look like?

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    So from the very begining, how does PC 1 know the IP address of PC4?
    In a real life example:
    When I tell my web browser to talk to youtube, how does my PC know the
    destination IP address to attempt to talk to?
    Does DNS and/or DHCP have a role in that?
    Does my home router have youtube's IP address in its routing table?

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Hi Jeremy,
    For example: when R1 received the ARP from pc1.. why it’s not sending ARP from R1 to R3.. its only sending to R2.

    Thanks.

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    When R1 sends out an ARP because it doesnt know R2s MAC address, does that get sent out of all of R1s interfaces? Im confused why it knew to only send out of Gi0/0. Love these vids btw

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    I have been studying these videos for the past week. Taking notes, using supplementary materials. Being new to IT it takes me a lot of time to digest the content. A video like this is an amazing review. Despite you stating it is not practical – it was! It allows us to see the larger picture. I know, I know – the real big picture is just behind the corner. Thank you. Looking forward to catching up with the whole course.

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    You are a naturally gifted knowledge transferrer. You dismantle the myths behind the technology with ease. My thanks know no limit.

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Hey Jeremy, why does a router need the mac address of the device, if it's routing table is already configured to send the packet out of a specific interface? Shouldn't it send the packet to the 'next hop' that we configured, regardless of whether or not it knows the mac address?

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Hi Jeremy! Thanks for this awesome free CCNA course. It's helping me a lot with my preparations. Just wondering which version of packet tracer do you use? Because I got an error with Day 11 and later packet tracer files saying it is not compatible with the version I am using (7.2.1).

    Thanks a lot!

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    I'm confused about the routers having two mac addresses? I thought each physical device could only have one?

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Hey Jeremy! Great videos really enjoying and learning a lot. I understand the process of arp request and reply now. What I am not quite getting is why the routers need to exchange MAC addresses to send the packet. I guess I am confused because routers refer to the routing table when deciding where to send the packet so I do not get why they need to exchange MAC addresses also. If that makes sense lol. I am prolly just thinking too hard

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Hi Jeremy! Thanks for sharing this amazing series with us.

    My question: Do Routers also broadcast an ARP REQUEST like switches do? For example when R1 sends ARP for 192.168.12.2 (R2) will it also go to R3?

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    very nicely explained ..i have a question why MAC address required ,cant it communicate over IP while communicating to another node

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Great work Jeremy! Many thanks for your valuable teaching videos.
    I'm in Day 12 and done all Quiz and Labs, really your course helps a lot!
    Once again many Thanks Jeremy

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Thank you Jeremy for all the great work you are doing for others. Really awesome way of teaching deep understanding 👍👍

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Hello Mr. Jeremy. Thank u again for this wonderfull knowledge u r providing.

    i just would like to know, if routers are layer 3 devices, then y is it using mac address to communicate! and how can a router encapsulate a packet with a Ethernet header (which is layer 2). when routers operate at Layer 3? pls correct me if am wrong.

    and how does a router know the destination ip address (in ARP req.) and not the MAC address?

    Thank you.

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Hi Jeremy during the quiz, you wrote when PC4 sent a packet to PC1, should not we consider it a frame?

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Hi Jeremy, it's the first time I'm commenting on your videos but I gotta say that they're really helpful. I've watched videos on CBTNuggets and they're a bit difficult for me to follow. Great job, and thank you for doing this. I love the flashcards and the labs you created. Just my two cents but, I think it'd be better if the labs are a little more difficult or complicated because it's through troubleshooting complexities that we learn the best. Nevertheless, thank you! Really appreciate your efforts

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Hi @Jeremy I'm taking your course as I'm preparing to take the exam by the end of August. 27th of August to be specific. Do you think that by then the series will have ended so I can benefit from all the materials before I take the exam? Cheers

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    MAC addressing is a layer 2 phenomenon. Then why do routers need MAC addresses to forward packets!?!

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Hi Jeremy, you videos are awesome and ease to understand. It is very good if you keep post the flashcards helps really good to review the study materials.

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Hi Jeremy, how many videos do you think you can make to complete the CCNA 200-301, just a rough estimation of videos or number of days/months so that I can manage my time to watch and study. Thank you so much. Cheers!

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Hi Jeremy, firstly thanks for creating this series. I've struggled to find a CCNA course that is simple and engaging. You have achieved both! Could you clarify the first quiz question please. Why would the destination mac address not be a broadcast? Doesn't a PC have to ARP with it's default gateway as well before sending the packet with a specific address? Thanks in advance! keep up the hard work!

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 23, 2020 at 6:35 pm
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    Theory class is always hard but you make the class easier for me. Thank you 🙂

    Reply

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