IPv6 Addresses Explained | Cisco CCNA 200-301



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When IPv4 first came out, the people that designed it sat back in their chairs and said, “We’ve done it, we’ve created every IP address that anyone will ever need”.

How many addresses did they create? 4,294,967,296! But at the time, they couldn’t have imagined the massive explosion of devices that would require an IP address. If you think about every device you own, like a pc, laptop, smartphone, tv etc. It quickly became apparent that we would soon run out of IPv4 addresses.

The solution is to eventually move over to the new IPv6 addresses!
IPv6 provides us with 340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 addresses!

Aside from the number of addresses, IPv6 also brings a lot of other improvements that make it a lot more efficient and practical.

An IPv6 address is 128-bits long. This is what gives us a huge address space. IPv6 has 8 sections which are commonly called hextets. Each hextet is separated by a colon. It’s a hexadecimal IP address, meaning it can contain both numbers and letters.

There are different types of IPv6 addresses, for different purposes.

Global Unicast
– A publicly routable address like the IPv4 public IP.
– Prefix: 2000::/3

Unique Local
– This address is like the ipv4 private IP addresses.
– Prefix: FC00::/7

Link-Local
– Automatic private IP addresses that are not routable over any network.
– Prefix: FE80::/10

Multicast
– Addresses that are sent to a group of computers or devices.
– Prefix: FF00::/8

Anycast
– Global Unicast address assigned to more than one device.
– Prefix: 2000::/3

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Alice AUSTIN

Alice AUSTIN is studying Cisco Systems Engineering. He has passion with both hardware and software and writes articles and reviews for many IT websites.

16 thoughts on “IPv6 Addresses Explained | Cisco CCNA 200-301

  • Avatar
    September 17, 2020 at 8:03 am
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    Thanks a lot for this video. I really enjoined it, since it is very explanatory, Of course you have to know a bit of HEX , BIN, and DEC 🙂 Keep up this good work.

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 17, 2020 at 8:03 am
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    I'm looking to make an ipv6 home network/lab just to play around with it and future-proof and wanted a refresher!

    Would have loved to have seen this during some of my networking classes a year ago! Great amount of detail, very clear! Definately dropping a sub + bookmark for when I get to that Cisco cert ;P

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  • Avatar
    September 17, 2020 at 8:03 am
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    I need your networking course right now I will pay money for this type of content :>

    Reply
  • Avatar
    September 17, 2020 at 8:03 am
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    Awesome !!! Taking my CCNA in a few weeks for school I think

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  • Avatar
    September 17, 2020 at 8:03 am
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    Love ur vids and explaination especially the routing protocols really helped to understand it. Do you plan to release full course on udemy or other platform soon?

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  • Avatar
    September 17, 2020 at 8:03 am
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    Calling this "the fundamentals of ipv6 address" is a bit of a stretch I'd say. And if one has to explain the binary system to an IT person then something went terribly wrong to begin with. Cutting down the video to 3 minutes and then adding info about RA/RS and SLAAC/DHCPv6 would've added much more value IMHO. There's even an error in the explanation of the local unicast addresses: For fc00::/7 stating that local uniqueness is sufficient is not quite correct. The creation algorithm of fc/8 is not yet defined and for fd/8 the remainder of the prefix (i.e. the global ID) is to be created randomly such that it is very likely globally unique. See RFC4193, section 3.

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